Roots and Patterns - ISBN: 9781402032448 - (ebook) - von Maya Arad, Verlag: Springer - Details - OvW eBook Shop

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Roots and Patterns

Hebrew Morpho-syntax
Studies in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, Band 63

von: Maya Arad

71,39 €

Verlag: Springer
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 30.03.2006
ISBN/EAN: 9781402032448
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 286

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Beschreibungen

In-depth investigation of Hebrew verb morphology in light of cutting edge theories of morphology and lexical semantics
An original theory about the semantic content of roots

An account of how roots function in word-formation

A wide empirical basis containing a complete corpus of verb-creating roots in Hebrew
This book is simultaneously a theoretical study in morphosyntax and an in-depth empirical study of Hebrew. Based on Hebrew data, the book defends the status of the root as a lexical and phonological unit and argues that roots, rather than verbs or nouns, are the primitives of word formation. A central claim made throughout the book is the role of locality in word formation, teasing apart word formation from roots and word formation from existing words syntactically, semantically and phonologically.
The book focuses on Hebrew, a language with rich verb morphology, where both roots and noun- and verb-creating morphology are morphologically transparent. The study of Hebrew verbs is based on a corpus of all Hebrew verb-creating roots, offering, for the first time, a survey of the full array of morpho-syntactic forms seen in the Hebrew verb.
While the focus of this study is on how roots function in word-formation, a central chapter studies the information encoded by the Hebrew root, arguing for a special kind of open-ended value, bounded within the classes of meaning analyzed by lexical semanticists.
The book is of wide interest to students of many branches of linguistics, including morphology, syntax and lexical semantics, as well as of to students Semitic languages.
Chapter 1: Roots: where syntax, morphology and the lexicon meet 1.1 Why roots? The decomposition debate. 1.2 Distributed morphology and the syntax-morphology interface. 1.3 Hebrew and the syntax-morphology interface. 1.4 The argument for the root: structure and scope of the book. Chapter 2: The noun-verb asymmetry in Hebrew: when are patterns obligatory? 2.1 Introduction: roots and features. 2.2 Hebrew roots and patterns: the verbal system. 2.3 A noun-verb asymmetry in Hebrew. 2.4 Accounting for the asymmetry: the obligatoriness of inflection? 2.5 Accounting for the asymmetry: the realization of grammatical features. 2.6 The stuff roots are made of: constraints on Hebrew verb-formation. 2.7 Summary Chapter 3: The contents of the root: Multiple Contextualized Meaning in Hebrew. 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Multiple Contextualized Meaning in Hebrew 3.3 Multiple Contextualized Meaning and the Root Hypothesis. Chapter 4: Regularity and irregularity in the Hebrew verbal system: an intermediate summary 4.1 Binyanim and their properties 4.2 Roots across patterns 4.3 Regularity and irregularity predicted and explained. Chapter 5: Roots across patterns in Hebrew: types and tokens 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Types and tokens 5.3 Verb alternations and morphological form 5.4 Binyanim as inflectional classes: Aronoff (1994) 5.5 Binyanim as representing functional heads: Doron (1999, 2003) 5.6 Binyanim and the typology of verb alternations: Haspelmath (1993) and Jacobsen (1992) Chapter 6: A Theory of Hebrew Verbal Morpho-Syntax 6.1 The Hebrew Verbal System and the Many-Many Nature of Morphology 6.2 A Theory of Hebrew verbal morpho-syntax 6.3 Summary Chapter 7:Roots in word-formation: the Root Hypothesis revisited 7.1 Roots and word-formation. 7.2 Root-derived verbs and noun-derived verbs. 7.3 In the absence of morphology: the semantic properties of denominals. 7.4 The remaining piece: verb-derived nouns. 7.5 Back to the root: the phonological properties of denominals. 7.6 Roots: between the universal and the language specific. References
This book is simultaneously a theoretical study in morphosyntax and an in-depth empirical study of Hebrew. Based on Hebrew data, the book defends the status of the root as a lexical and phonological unit and argues that roots, rather than verbs or nouns, are the primitives of word formation. A central claim made throughout the book is the role of locality in word formation, teasing apart word formation from roots and word formation from existing words syntactically, semantically and phonologically.
The book focuses on Hebrew, a language with rich verb morphology, where both roots and noun- and verb-creating morphology are morphologically transparent. The study of Hebrew verbs is based on a corpus of all Hebrew verb-creating roots, offering, for the first time, a survey of the full array of morpho-syntactic forms seen in the Hebrew verb.
While the focus of this study is on how roots function in word-formation, a central chapter studies the information encoded by the Hebrew root, arguing for a special kind of open-ended value, bounded within the classes of meaning analyzed by lexical semanticists.
The book is of wide interest to students of many branches of linguistics, including morphology, syntax and lexical semantics, as well as of to students Semitic languages.

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